The Community Library https://www.comlib.org The Community Library is a non-profit, privately funded, free public library serving Ketchum, Sun Valley, the Wood River Valley, Idaho and the world. Sat, 20 Jan 2018 20:28:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 https://www.comlib.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/cropped-favicon-copy-32x32.png The Community Library https://www.comlib.org 32 32 Champions and Chairlifts: Sun Valley Ski History from 1930 to 2010 https://www.comlib.org/champions-chairlifts/ Sat, 20 Jan 2018 20:28:15 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=12507 Take a trip down memory lane and view the exhibit on Sun Valley ski history at the Sun Valley Museum of History. The exhibit showcases local ski history, including ski fashion, equipment trends, the ski school, and racing accomplishments. Make new discoveries about your local slopes. The displays are organized by decade, starting with the 1930s and the early years of Sun Valley.

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The Lucky Ones https://www.comlib.org/the-lucky-ones/ Tue, 17 Oct 2017 20:10:55 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11924 Shot by Boise photographer Madeline Scott, “The Lucky Ones” is a unique photo-journalism exhibit chronicling the arrival of refugees to Boise between February and April of 2017, and their subsequent integration into daily life in Boise. In partnership with the International Rescue Committee, Boise. Opens October 18, 2017.

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Ernest Hemingway at Home in Idaho https://www.comlib.org/ernest-hemingway-home-idaho/ Wed, 27 Sep 2017 16:49:37 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11028   Ernest Hemingway in Sun Valley Ernest Hemingway’s first visit to Sun Valley was on September 20, 1939.  Averell Harriman, Chairman of the Board of Union Pacific Railroad, wanted to attract people to the new Sun Valley Resort in summer and fall seasons in addition to winter.  Lloyd Arnold and Gene Van Guilder thought Hemingway, with his love for hunting and fishing, would be a natural to publicize these other seasons.  Hemingway was offered the Sun Valley guest facilities at no cost for two years in the fall in return for helping publicize Sun Valley. Hemingway arrived in Sun Valley with Martha Gellhorn – at that time his second marriage to Pauline Pfeiffer was on the rocks.  His primary interest was to work on his book about the Spanish Civil War.  He was not interested in trout fishing – too time consuming, but would go duck and pheasant hunting in the afternoons after rising early in the morning and working on For Whom the Bells Tolls. Hemingway stayed in Suite 206 – he called it “The Glamour House.”  Among the interesting locals he met were the Arnolds.  While dining at the Ram Restaurant he met Lloyd and soon after Lloyd’s wife Tillie while having breakfast in the Inn.  He stared at her. Because of her resemblance to his estranged wife Pauline, he thought she was Pauline come to Sun Valley to catch him with Marty Gellhorn.  She was called Tillie because with her short haircut she looked like Tillie the Toiler, the cartoon character on the Second World War posters.  Her real name was Erma. On October 28, 1939, Lloyd Arnold, Gene Van Guilder, and Dave Benner, all friends of Hemingway, went duck hunting on the Snake River.  All three were in a canoe with Gene in front (the bow), Dave in the center, and Lloyd in the rear (stern).  When a flock of ducks flew overhead, Gene stood up in the canoe, lost his balance and fell into the line of Benner’s shot.  Two grievous errors.  Gene in the bow should not have stood up and only one person, Gene, in the bow should have shot.  Also Dave should have unloaded his gun.  Brenner’s shot ripped a huge hole under Van Guilder’s right shoulder.  The shot went directly into his lungs and Van Guilder bled profusely.  Within thirty minutes he was dead.  Van Guilder’s wife, Nin, asked Hemingway to write something for Gene and read it at the graveside service.  The funeral was November 1st, 1939.  Hemingway was a pall bearer and he read the eulogy. Hemingway and Martha returned to Sun Valley in the fall of 1940 and 1941.  Sun Valley Resort closed in 1942 – 1945 and was a Naval Hospital during World War II. Hemingway returned in the fall of 1946 with new wife Mary Welsh.  Hemingway had saved Mary’s life in Casper, Wyoming.  She had suffered a tubal pregnancy and her fallopian tubes ruptured causing her veins to collapse.  Hemingway cut into a vein to get plasma started. Mary and Ernest had stayed at Sun Valley Resort in room 206 whenever they visited. However, their stay became extended in 1946 and they rented McDonald’s Cabins and again in 1947 when  Hemingway worked on writing “Garden of Eden.”  Hemingway and Mary did not return to Sun Valley until the fall of 1958.  They rented the Heiss house September 15 – December l then rented the Witcher house on 2nd Ave. for the rest of the winter.  In the spring of 1959 Hemingway bought Bob Topping’s house and thirteen acres overlooking the Big Wood River.  The price – $50,000, now worth millions – almost priceless. Taylor Williams, a dear friend and hunting companion of Hemingway’s since 1939, died on February 18, 1959, at the age of 72.  He was buried in Ketchum Cemetery close to Gene Van Guilder.  Hemingway was a pall bearer.  Hemingway spent most of 1959 in Spain doing research on bullfighting.  He and Mary came back to Sun Valley in 1959 for Christmas in their new house  by the Big Wood River.  1960 saw Hemingway deteriorate mentally.  George Saviers checked him into the Mayo Clinic on November 30, 1960. Mary and Ernst Hemingway returned to Ketchum in the Spring 1961. Hemingway killed himself in his home with a shot gun on July 2, 1961.

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Ski Troops https://www.comlib.org/ski-troops/ Wed, 27 Sep 2017 16:19:07 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11077 Forming the 10th Mountain Division The 10th Mountain Division of the United States Army began on November 15, 1941, with the activation of the 87th Infantry Mountain Regiment. The War Department desired defensive measures against possible invasion over the U.S. northern border so they prioritized training soldiers for combat in mountain conditions. During the War of 1812, enemy soldiers invaded the United States through the Champlain Valley in New York and Vermont. From this experience, the US military leadership desired trained soldiers who could defend the Green Mountains of Vermont and the Adirondacks of New York from potential German invasion during World War II. One of the most influential figures in the creation of a mountain force was Charles Minot “Minnie” Dole. Dole, the head of the National Ski Association saw the potential for skiers and mountaineers to contribute to national defense. He lobbied hard for training troops in mountain combat, and eventually he and other expert skiers served as advisors to the Army. Thanks in large part to Dole and his efforts, the Army created the 10th Mountain Division, which became known as “Minnie’s troops.” The first regiment of ski troops, the 87th Mountain Infantry, was formed at Fort Lewis the following November. Army units in all parts of the country sent their crack skiers to the new regiment.   Recruitment and Training As part of Dole’s involvement, the National Ski Association was the only civilian organization approved for Army recruitment. Relying on three letters of recommendation per applicant, they recruited skiers, mountaineers, and outdoorsmen from across the country. They wanted people who had some of the skills needed to be part of a mountain division and the willingness to train in tough mountain conditions. The idea of being a soldier on skis carried quite a bit of glamour for recruitment, resulting in  a high number of college-educated men. Some who could have been officers in the Army chose instead to be privates in the 10th Mountain Division. Publicity films used for recruitment showed ski troops in their white uniforms on beautiful slopes. Despite the recruitment of men with prior experience, the 10th Mountain Division required additional training. Soldiers needed to be trained in downhill and cross country skiing and climbing, as well as basic training in weapons and combat. Training for rough conditions was essential. Most of this training took place at Camp Hale in Colorado, at an elevation of 9,000 feet above sea level. The high altitude was brutal for many soldiers, especially while carrying 90 pounds of gear.   Veterans in the Post-War Ski Industry The 10th Mountain Division was one of the best trained divisions in the Army with the most elite skills, training for a total of three years before entering the war. The division was the last to be deployed to action. Fighting in the North Apennine Mountains in Italy in 1945, they obtained decisive victories. Of the 14,000 men who fought, 992 were killed and 4,154 were wounded. Their contribution was brief, but meaningful. After the war, a number of these well-trained veterans came back to the United States and developed the ski industry. Veterans developed the ski resorts at Vail, Sugarbush Valley in Vermont, and Crystal Mountain in Washington. Some of the veterans entered the ski or sports technology industry. In Sun Valley, one of the early head’s of the Ski School was Freidl Pfeifer. The post-war manager of Bald Mountain was Nelson Bennett for many years before he went on to manage White Pass ski resort. 10th Mountain’s Bill Bowerman was another who went to be an entrepreneur. In 1964, he and a former Oregon runner named Phil Knight started a little company called Blue Ribbon Sports, which would later become a little company called Nike. Veteran Fritz Benedict, a ski racer who served in Italy, was a Frank Lloyd Wright protege, When he returned to civilian life, he designed the master plans and other design work for several Colorado ski resorts, including Breckenridge, Vail, Snowmass, Winter Park, and Steamboat. His best-known contribution to ski culture came to fruition in the early 1980s: The idea for a an American hut system in the Colorado mountains-the 10 huts linked by ski trails, known as the 10th Mountain Division Huts.

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Railroad Ties: Tracking the History of Sun Valley https://www.comlib.org/railroad-ties-tracking-history-sun-valley/ Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:31:24 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11030 Celebrating the 130th anniversary of the arrival of railroad transportation into Ketchum, Idaho, in 1884, The Community Library’s debut museum exhibition, Railroad Ties: Tracking the History of Sun Valley, opened Thursday, July 10, 2014. This premiere exhibit of the Sun Valley Museum of History (SVMoH) explains how the economic and sociocultural impacts of the railroad helped to shape the Wood River Valley. Museum visitors travel through various eras: from the prehistory of early peoples, to the history of mining and ranching, to the destination resort that Sun Valley is today. The railroad theme serves as the connection to understanding Sun Valley’s unique history. This exhibit was made possible by the generous support of the Wattis Dumke Foundation and the Idaho State Historical Society.        

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Portraits from Standing Rock https://www.comlib.org/portraits-standing-rock/ Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:29:22 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11108 The Portraits from Standing Rock exhibition featured photographs by Jen Rosenstein and text by Molly Larkey. They visited Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock, North Dakota, in November 2016, where Molly interviewed organizers and allies who came to stand with the Standing Rock Sioux. Oceti Sakowin Camp was a historical gathering of First Nations and their allies that centered indigenous sovereignty within the larger fight for the environment, decolonization, and social and economic justice. By creating a native-centered community based in ethical and spiritual principals, the camp modeled a platform for organizing against the root causes of white supremacy, extractive and exploitative industry, and other forms of injustice.

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Refugee Portrait Project https://www.comlib.org/refugee-portrait-project/ Thu, 21 Sep 2017 22:42:17 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11158 photographs by Ken Bingham  

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This is My Home Now: Narrative Textiles by Idaho Newcomers https://www.comlib.org/home-now-narrative-textiles-idaho-newcomers/ Thu, 21 Sep 2017 22:42:02 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11115 The post This is My Home Now: Narrative Textiles by Idaho Newcomers appeared first on The Community Library.

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WaterWays https://www.comlib.org/waterways/ Thu, 21 Sep 2017 22:41:28 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=11110 WaterWays, a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institute. WaterWays is an interactive exhibit that explores water as a critical scientific and cultural resource. In addition to the multimedia exhibit designed by the Smithsonian, the Library has created several unique complementary aspects to the exhibit, including a large-scale map of the local watershed, a video oral history project, a display of fine art by local artist Deborra Marshall Bohrer, and locally-created set of word puzzles pertaining to water. “It’s a really powerful exhibit not only because water touches our lives in diverse ways, but our perspectives vary, too, from art to hydrology,” said Mary Tyson, the Library’s Director of Regional History. “The exhibit makes us reflect and, maybe more importantly, keep a conversation going about water.” The Library’s video oral history project, created especially for this exhibit, includes 25 short local video interviews with various locals who have different kinds of relationships with water, such as Kevin Lakey, District 37 Watermaster, and Nick Purdy, Double R rancher. There is a wall-sized satellite image of the Malad river system. And there is a water-inspired artwork by Deborra Marshall Bohrer. There is a water-related locally created word puzzle and a raffle prize drawing. The Library’s Sun Valley Museum of History is the second exhibit site in the state, following the Idaho Falls Public Library. Next it will travel to the Idaho Museum of Natural History (Pocatello), Nampa Public Library, The Third Street Gallery in collaboration with the Latah County Historical Society (Moscow) and the Burley Public Library.

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Firelines: The Story of Wildland Fires in the American West https://www.comlib.org/firelines-story-wildland-fires-american-west/ https://www.comlib.org/firelines-story-wildland-fires-american-west/#respond Fri, 16 Jun 2017 16:39:52 +0000 https://www.comlib.org/?p=10827 The Community Library’s Sun Valley Museum of History’s exhibition, Firelines: The Story of Wildland Fires in the American West, is open through October 7, 2017. Firelines offers an overview of wildland firefighting history in the West and remembrances of the local wildland fires. The Library’s Regional History Department developed this new exhibit. There is a timeline from 1865 to the present which creates a firefighting perspective. The exhibit continues on to discuss the most recent fires in the Wood River Valley, the 2007 Castle Rock and the 2013 Beaver Creek fires and how they impacted the community. Firelines exhibits wildland firefighters essential tools, photographs of the Castle Rock and Beaver Creek fires, and a video display of “Firestories,” interviews with Wood River Valley residents about their personal memories of these two fires. In addition, the exhibit features regional maps showing the location and growth of fires in Idaho. Firelines is a collaboration with the Environmental Resource Center.   See Also “Locals relate fire stories in new museum exhibition.” June 14, 2017, article in the Idaho Mountain Express. “Learn about wildfire history in Ketchum.” June 16, 2017, article in the Times-News. “Visit Man’s Complicated Relationships with Fire.” June 17, 2017, article from Eye on Sun Valley. Blog posts from The Community Library at the time of the Beaver Creek fire.

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